Wednesday, August 23, 2017

How to Optimize for Google’s Featured Snippets to Build More Traffic

Posted by AnnSmarty

Have you noticed it's getting harder and harder to build referral traffic from Google?

And it's not just that the competition has got tougher (which it certainly has!).

It's also that Google has moved past its ten blue links and its organic search results are no longer generating as much traffic they used to.

How do you adapt? This article teaches you to optimize your content to one of Google's more recent changes: featured snippets.

What are featured snippets?

Featured snippets are selected search results that are featured on top of Google's organic results below the ads in a box.

Featured snippets aim at answering the user's question right away (hence their other well-known name, "answer boxes"). Being featured means getting additional brand exposure in search results.

Here are two studies confirming the claim:

  • Ben Goodsell reports that the click-through rate (CTR) on a featured page increased from two percent to eight percent once it's placed in an answer box, with revenue from organic traffic increasing by 677%.
  • Eric Enge highlights a 20–30% increase in traffic for ConfluentForms.com while they held the featured snippet for the query.

Types of featured snippets

There are three major types of featured snippets:

  • Paragraph (an answer is given in text). It can be a box with text inside or a box with both text and an image inside.
  • List (an answer is given in a form of a list)
  • Table (an answer is given in a table)

Here's an example of paragraph snippet with an image:

paragraph snippet image

According to Getstat, the most popular featured snippet is "paragraph" type:

Getstat

Featured snippets or answer boxes?

Since we're dealing with a pretty new phenomenon, the terminology is pretty loose. Many people (including myself) are inclined to refer to featured snippets as "answer boxes," obviously because there's an answer presented in a box.

While there's nothing wrong with this terminology, it creates a certain confusion because Google often gives a "quick answer" (a definition, an estimate, etc.) on top without linking to the source:

Answer box

To avoid confusion, let's stick to the "featured snippet" term whenever there's a URL featured in the box, because these present an extra exposure to the linked site (hence they're important for content publishers):

Featured snippet

Do I have a chance to get featured?

According to research by Ahrefs, 99.58% of featured pages already rank in top 10 of Google. So if you are already ranking high for related search queries, you have very good chances to get featured.

On the other hand, Getstat claims that 70% of snippets came from sites outside of the first organic position. So it's required that the page is ranked in top 10, but it's not required to be #1 to be featured.

Unsurprisingly, the most featured site is Wikipedia.org. If there's Wikipedia featured for your search query, it may be extremely hard to beat that — but it doesn't mean you shouldn't try.

Finally, according to the analysis performed in a study, the following types of search queries get featured results most often:

  • DIY processes
  • Health
  • Financial
  • Mathematical
  • Requirements
  • Status
  • Transitional

Ahrefs' study expands the list of popular topics with their most frequently words that appear in featured snippets:

words trigger featured snippets

The following types of search queries usually don't have answer boxes:

  • Images and videos
  • Local
  • Shopping

To sum up the above studies:

  • You have chances to get featured for the terms your pages are already ranking in top 10. Thus, a big part of being featured is to improve your overall rankings (especially for long-tail informational queries, which are your lower-hanging fruit)
  • If your niche is DIY, health or finance, you have the highest probability of getting featured

Identify all kinds of opportunities to be featured

Start with good old keyword research

Multiple studies confirm that the majority of featured snippets are triggered by long-tail keywords. In fact, the more words that are typed into a search box, the higher the probability there will be a featured snippet.

It's always a good idea to start with researching your keywords. This case study gives a good step by step keyword research strategy for a blogger, and this one lists major keyword research tools as suggested by experts.

When performing keyword research with featured snippets in mind, note that:

  • Start with question-type search queries (those containing question words, like "what," "why," "how," etc.) because these are the easiest to identify, but don't stop there…
  • Target informational intent, not just questions. While featured snippets aim at answering the user's question immediately, question-type queries are not the only types that trigger those featured results. According to the aforementioned Ahrefs study, the vast majority of keywords that trigger featured snippets were long-tail queries with no question words in them.

It helps if you use a keyword research tool that shows immediately whether a query triggers featured results. I use Serpstat for my keyword research because it combines keyword research with featured snippet research and lets me see which of my keywords trigger answer boxes:

Serpstat featured snippet

You can run your competitor in Serpstat and then filter their best-performing queries by the presence of answer boxes:

Serpstat competitor research

This is a great overview of your future competition, enabling you to see your competitors' strengths and weaknesses.

Browse Google for more questions

To further explore the topic, be sure to browse Google's own "People also ask" sections whenever you see one in the search results. It provides a huge insight into which questions Google deems related to each topic.

People also ask section

Once you start expanding the questions to see the answers, more and more questions will be added to the bottom of the box:

More questions

Identify search queries where you already rank high

Your lowest-hanging fruit is to identify which phrases you already rank highly for. These will be the easiest to get featured for after you optimize for answer boxes (more on this below).

Google Search Console shows which search queries send you clicks. To find that report, click "Search Traffic" and then "Search Analytics."

Check the box to show the position your pages hold for each one and you'll have the ability to see which queries are your top-performing ones:

Google Search Console

You can then use the filters to find some question-type queries among those:

Search console filter

Go beyond traditional keyword research tools: Ask people

All the above methods (albeit great) tackle already discovered opportunities: those for which you or your competitors are already ranking high. But how about venturing beyond that? Ask your readers, customers, and followers how they search and which questions they ask.

MyBlogU: Ask people outside your immediate reach

Move away from your target audience and ask random people what questions they have on a specific topic and what would be their concerns. Looking out of the box can always give a fresh perspective.

MyBlogU (disclaimer: I am the founder) is a great way to do that. Just post a new project in the "Brainstorm" section and ask members to contribute their thoughts.

MyBlogU concept

Seed Keywords: Ask your friends and followers

Seed Keywords is a simple tool that allows you to discover related keywords with help from your friends and followers. Simply create a search scenario, share it on social media, and ask your followers to type in the keywords they would use to solve it.

Try not to be too leading with your search scenario. Avoid guiding people to the search phrase you think they should be using.

Here's an example of a scenario:

Example

And here are the suggestions from real people:

Seed Keywords

Obviously, you can create similar surveys with SurveyMonkey or Google Forms, too.

Monitor questions people ask on Twitter

Another way to discover untapped opportunities is to monitor questions on Twitter. Its search supports the ? search operator that will filter results to those containing a question. Just make sure to put a space between your search term and ?.

Twitter questions

I use Cyfe to monitor and archive Twitter results because it provides a minimal dashboard which I can use to monitor an unlimited number of Twitter searches.

Cyfe questions

Once you lack article ideas, simply log in to Cyfe to view the archive and then proceed to the above keyword research tools to expand on any idea.

I use spreadsheets to organize questions and keyword phrases I discover (see more on this below). Some of these questions may become a whole piece of content, while others will be subsections of broader articles:

  • I don't try to analyze search volume to decide whether any of those questions deserve to be covered in a separate article or a subsection. (Based on the Ahrefs research and my own observations, there is no direct correlation between the popularity of the term and whether it will trigger a featured snippet).
  • Instead, I use my best judgement (based on my niche knowledge and research) as to how much I will be able to tell to answer each particular question. If it's a lot, I'll probably turn into a separate article and use keyword research to identify subsections of the future piece.

Optimizing for featured snippets

Start with on-page SEO

There is no magic button or special markup which will make sure your site gets featured. Of course, it's a good idea to start with non-specific SEO best practices, simply because being featured is only possible when you rank high for the query.

Randy Milanovic did a good overview of tactics of making your content findable. Eric Brantner over at Coschedule has put together a very useful SEO checklist, and of course never forget to go through Moz's SEO guide.

How about structured markup?

Many people would suggest using Schema.org (simply because it's been a "thing" to recommend adding schema for anything and everything) but the aforementioned Ahrefs study shows that there's no correlation between featured results and structured markup.

That being said, the best way to get featured is to provide a better answer. Here are a few actionable tips:

1. Aim at answering each question concisely

My own observation of answer boxes has led me to think that Google prefers to feature an answer which was given within one paragraph.

The study by AJ Ghergich cites that the average length of a paragraph snippet is 45 words (the maximum is 97 words), so let it be your guideline as to how long each answer should be in order to get featured:

Optimal featured snippet lengths

This doesn't mean your articles need to be one paragraph long. On the contrary, these days Google seems to give preference to long-form content (also known as "cornerstone content," which is obviously a better way to describe it because it's not just about length) that's broken into logical subsections and features attention-grabbing images. Even if you don't believe that cornerstone content receives any special treatment in SERPs, focusing on long articles will help you to cover more related questions within one piece (more on that below).

All you need to do is to adjust your blogging style just a bit:

  • Ask the question in your article (that may be a subheading)
  • Immediately follow the question with a one-paragraph answer
  • Elaborate further in the article

This tactic may also result in higher user retention because it makes any article better structured and thus a much easier read. To quote AJ Ghergich,

When you use data to fuel topic ideation, content creation becomes more about resources and less about brainstorming.

2. Be factual and organize well

Google loves numbers, steps and lists. We've seen this again and again: More often than not, answer boxes will list the actual ingredients, number of steps, time to cook, year and city of birth, etc.

In your paragraph introducing the answer to the question, make sure to list useful numbers and names. Get very factual.

In fact, the aforementioned study by AJ Ghergich concluded that comparison charts and lists are an easier way to get featured because Google loves structured content. In fact, even for branded queries (where a user is obviously researching a particular brand), Google would pick up a table from another site (not the answer from the brand itself) if that other site has a table:

Be factual

This only shows how much Google loves well-structured, factual, and number-driven content.

There's no specific markup to structure your content. Google seems to pick up <table>, <ol>, and <ul> well and doesn't need any other pointers.

3. Make sure one article answers many similar questions

In their research of featured snippets, Ahrefs found that once a page gets featured, it's likely to get featured in lots of similar queries. This means it should be structured and worded the way it addresses a lot of related questions.

Google is very good at determining synonymic and closely related questions, so should be you. There's no point in creating a separate page answering each specific question.

Related question

Creating one solid article addressing many related questions is a much smarter strategy if you aim at getting featured in answer boxes. This leads us to the next tactic:

4. Organize your questions properly

To combine many closely related questions in one article, you need to organize your queries properly. This will also help you structure your content well.

I have a multi-level keyword organization strategy that can be applied here as well:

  • A generic keyword makes a section or a category of the blog
  • A more specific search query becomes the title of the article
  • Even more specific queries determine the subheadings of the article and thus define its structure
    • There will be multiple queries that are so closely related that they will all go under a single subheading

For example:

Spreadsheet

Serpstat helps me a lot when it comes to both discovering an article idea and then breaking it into subtopics. Check out its "Questions" section. It will provide hundreds of questions containing your core term and then generate a tag cloud of other popular terms that come up in those questions:

Questions tag cloud

Clicking any word in the tag cloud will filter results down to those questions that only have that word in them. These are subsections for your article:

Serpstat subheadings

Here's a good example of how related questions can help you structure the article:

Structure

5. Make sure to use eye-grabbing images

Paragraph featured snippets with images are ridiculously eye-catching, even more so than regular featured featured snippets. Honestly, I wasn't able to identify how to add an image so that it's featured. I tried naming it differently and I tried marking it as "featured" in the WordPress editor. Google seems to pick up a random image from the page without me being able to point it to a better version.

That being said, the only way to influence that is to make sure ALL your in-article images are eye-catching, branded, and annotated well, so that no matter which one Google ends up featuring, it will look nice. Here's a great selection of WordPress plugins that will allow you to easily visualize your content (put together graphs, tables, charts, etc.) while working on a piece.

You can use Bannersnack to create eye-catching branded images; I love their image editing functionality. You can quickly create graphics there, then resize them to reuse as banners and social media images and organize all your creatives in folders:

banner maker bannersnack

6. Update and re-upload the images (WordPress)

WordPress adds dates to image URLs, so even if you update an article with newer information the images can be considered kind of old. I managed to snatch a couple of paragraph featured snippets with images once I started updating my images, too:

Images

7. Monitor how you are doing

Ahrefs lets you monitor which queries your domain is featured for, so keep an eye on these as they grow and new ones appear:

Monitor where you are being featured

Conclusion

It takes a lot of research and planning and you cannot be sure when you'll see the results (especially if you don't have too many top 10 rankings just yet) but think about this way: Being featured in Google search results is your incentive to work harder on your content. You'll achieve other important goals on your way there:

  • You'll discover hundreds of new content ideas (and thus will rank for a wider variety of various long-tail keywords)
  • You'll learn to research each topic more thoroughly (and thus will build more incoming links because people tend to link to indepth articles)
  • You'll learn to structure your articles better (and thus achieve a lower bounce rate because it will be easier to read your articles)

Have you been featured in Google search results yet? Please share your tips and tricks in the comments below!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

from Moz Blog https://moz.com/blog/optimize-featured-snippets
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/how-to-optimize-for-googles-featured.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/how-to-optimize-for-googles-featured-snippets-to-build-more-traffic/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/how-to-optimize-for-googles-featured-snippets-to-build-more-traffic/
via IFTTT




from WordPress https://mrliberta.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/how-to-optimize-for-googles-featured-snippets-to-build-more-traffic/
via IFTTT

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

How to Perform a Basic Local Business Competitive Audit

Posted by MiriamEllis

"Why are those folks outranking me in Google's local pack?"

If you or a client is asking this question, the answer lies in competitive analysis. You've got to stack Business A up against Business B to identify the strengths and weaknesses of both competitors, and then make an educated guess as to which factors Google is weighting most in the results for a specific search term.

Today, I'd like to share a real-world example of a random competitive audit, including a chart that depicts which factors I've investigated and explanatory tips and tools for how I came up with the numbers and facts. Also included: a downloadable version of the spreadsheet that you can use for your own company or clients. Your goal with this audit is to identify exactly how one player is winning the game so that you can create a to-do list for any company trying to move up in the rankings. Alternatively, some competitive audits can be defensive, identifying a dominant player's weaknesses so that they can be corrected to ensure continued high rankings.

It's my hope that seeing this audit in action will help you better answer the question of why "this person is outranking that person," and that you may share with our community some analytical tips of your own!

The scenario:

localseoaudit.jpg

Search term: Chinese Restaurant San Rafael

Statistics about San Rafael: A large town of approximately 22 square miles in the San Francisco Bay Area with a population of 58,954 and 15+ Chinese restaurants.

Consistency of results: From 20 miles away to 2000+ miles away, Ping's Chinese Cuisine outranks Yet Wah Restaurant in Google's local pack for the search term. We don't look closer than 20 miles, or proximity of the searcher creates too much diversity.

The challenge: Why is Ping's Chinese Cuisine outranking Yet Wah Restaurant in Google's Local Pack for the search term?

The comparison chart

*Where there's a clear winner, it's noted in bolded, italicized text.

Basic business information

NAP

Ping's Chinese Cuisine
248 Northgate Dr.
San Rafael, CA 94903
(415) 492-8808

Yet Wah Restaurant
1238 4th St.
San Rafael, CA 94901
(415) 460-9883

GMB landing page URL

http://pingsnorthgate.com/

http://www.yetwahchinese.com/

Local Pack rank

1

2

Organic rank

17

5

Organic rank among business-owned sites
*Remove directories and review platforms from the equation, as they typically shouldn't be viewed as direct competitors

8

1

Business model eligible for GMB listing at this address?
*Check Google's Guidelines if unsure: https://support.google.com/business/answer/3038177…

Yes

Yes

Oddities

Note that Ping's has redirected pingschinesecuisine.com to pingsnorthgate.com. Ping's also has a www and non-www version of pingsnorthgate.com.

A 2nd website for same business at same location with same phone number: http://yetwahsanrafael.com/. This website is ranking directly below the authoritative (GMB-linked) website for this business in organic SERP for the search in question.

Business listings

GMB review count

32

38

GMB review rating

4.1

3.8

Most recent GMB review
*Sort GMB reviews by "most recent" filter

1 week ago

1 month ago

Proper GMB categories?

Yes

Yes

Estimated age of GMB listing
*Estimated by date of oldest reviews and photos, but can only be seen as an estimate

At least 2 years old

At least 6 years old

Moz Local score (completeness + accuracy + lack of duplicates)
*Tool: https://moz.com/local/search

49%

75%

Moz Local duplicate findings
*Tool: https://moz.com/local/search

0

1 (Facebook)

Keywords in GMB name

chinese

restaurant

Keywords in GMB website landing page title tag

Nothing at all. Just "home page"

Yes

Spam in GMB title
*Look at GMB photos, Google Streetview, and the website to check for inconsistencies

No

Yes: "restaurant" not in website logo or street level signage

Hours and photos on GMB?

Yes

Yes

Proximity to city centroid
*Look up city by name in Google Maps and see where it places the name of the city on the map. That's the city "centroid." Get driving directions from the business to an address located in the centroid.

3.5 miles

410.1 feet

Proximity to nearest competitor
*Zoom in on Google map to surface as many adjacent competitors as possible. Can be a Possum factor in some cases.

1.1 mile

0.2 miles

Within Google Maps boundaries?
*Look up city by name in Google Maps and note the pink border via which Google designates that city's boundaries

Yes

Yes

Website

Age of domain
*Tool: http://smallseotools.com/domain-age-checker/

March 2013

August 2011

Domain Authority
*Tool: https://moz.com/products/pro/seo-toolbar

16

8

GMB Landing Page Authority
*Tool: https://moz.com/products/pro/seo-toolbar

30

21

Links to domain
*Tool: https://moz.com/researchtools/ose/

53

2

DA/PA of most authoritative link earned
*Tool: https://moz.com/researchtools/ose/

72/32

38/16

Evaluation of website content

*This is a first-pass, visual gut check, just reading through the top-level pages of the website to see how they strike you in terms of quality.

Extremely thin, just adequate to identify restaurant. At least has menu on own site. Of the 2 sites, this one has the most total text, by virtue of a sentence on the homepage and menus in real text.

Extremely thin, almost zero text on homepage, menu link goes to another website.

Evaluation of website design

Outdated

Outdated, mostly images

Evaluation of website UX

Can be navigated, but few directives or CTAs

Can be navigated, but few directives or CTAs

Mobile-friendly
*Tool: https://search.google.com/test/mobile-friendly

Basic mobile design, but Google's mobile-friendly test tool says both www and non-www cannot be reached because it's unavailable or blocked by robots txt. They have disallowed scripts, photos, Flash, images, and plugins. This needs to be further investigated and resolved. Mobile site URL is http://pingsnorthgate.com/#2962. Both this URL and the other domains are failing Google's test.

Basic mobile design passes Google's mobile-friendly test

Evaluation of overall onsite SEO
*A first-pass visual look at the page code of top level pages, checking for titles, descriptions, header tags, schema, + the presence of problems like Flash.

Pretty much no optimization

Minimal, indeed, but a little bit of effort made. Some title tags, some schema, some header tags.

HTML NAP on website?

Yes

Yes

Website NAP matches GMB NAP?

No (Northgate One instead of Northgate Drive)

Yes

Total number of wins: Ping's 7, Yet Wah 9.

Download your own version of my competitive audit spreadsheet by making a copy of the file.

Takeaways from the comparison chart

Yet Wah significantly outranks Ping's in the organic results, but is being beaten by them in the Local Pack. Looking at the organic factors, we see evidence that, despite the fact that Ping's has greater DA, greater PA of the GMB landing page, more links, and stronger links, they are not outranking Yet Wah organically. This is something of a surprise that leads us to look at their content and on-page SEO.

While Ping's has slightly better text content on their website, they have almost done almost zero optimization work, their URLs have canonical issues, and their robots.txt isn't properly configured. Yet Wah has almost no on-site content, but they have modestly optimized their title tags, implemented H tags and some schema, and their site passes Google's mobile-friendly test.

So, our theory regarding Yet Wah's superior organic ranking is that, in this particular case, Yet Wah's moderate efforts with on-page SEO have managed to beat out Ping's superior DA/PA/link metrics. Yet Wah's website is also a couple of years older than Ping's.

All that being said, Yet Wah's organic win is failing to translate into a local win for them. How can we explain Ping's local win? Ping's has a slightly higher overall review rating, higher DA and GMB landing page PA, more total links, and higher authority links. They also have slightly more text content on their website, even if it's not optimized.

So, our theory regarding Ping's superior local rank is that, in this particular case, website authority/links appear to be winning the day for Ping's. And the basic website text they have could possibly be contributing, despite lack of optimization.

In sum, basic on-page SEO appears to be contributing to Yet Wah's organic win, while DA/PA/links appear to be contributing to Ping's local win.

Things that bother me

I chose this competitive scenario at random, because when I took an initial look at the local and organic rankings, they bothered me a little. I would have expected Yet Wah to be first in the local pack if they were first in organic. I see local and organic rankings correlate strongly so much of the time, that this case seemed odd to me.

By the end of the audit, I've come up with a working theory, but I'm not 100% satisfied with it. It makes me ask questions like:

  • Is Ping's better local rank stemming from some hidden factor no one knows about?
  • In this particular case, why is Google appearing to value Ping's links more that Yet Wah's on-page SEO in determining local rank? Would I see this same trend across the board if I analyzed 1,000 restaurants? The industry says links are huge in local SEO right now. I guess we're seeing proof of that here.
  • Why isn't Google weighting Yet Wah's superior citation set more than they apparently are? Ping's citations are in bad shape. I've seen citation health play a much greater apparent role in other audits, but something feels weird here.
  • Why isn't Google "punishing" Yet Wah in the organic results for that second website with duplicate NAP on it? That seems like it should matter.
  • Why isn't age factoring in more here? My inspection shows that Yet Wah's domain and GMB listing are significantly older. This could be moving the organic needle for them, but it's not moving the local one.
  • Could user behavior be making Ping's the local winner? This is a huge open question at the end of my basic audit.* See below.

*I don't have access to either restaurant's Google Analytics, GMB Insights, or Google Search Console accounts, so perhaps that would turn up penalties, traffic patterns, or things like superior clicks-to-call, clicks-for-directions, or clicks-to-website that would make Ping's local win easier to explain. If one of these restaurants were your client, you'd want to add chart rows for these things based on full access to the brand's accounts and tools, and whatever data your tools can access about the competitor. For example, using a tool like SimilarWeb, I see that between May and June of this year, YetWah's traffic rose from an average 150 monthly visits up to a peak of 500, while Ping's saw a drop from 700 to 350 visits in that same period. Also, in a scenario in which one or both parties have a large or complex link profile, you might want additional rows for link metrics, taken from tools like Moz Pro, Ahrefs, or Majestic.

In this case, Ping's has 7 total wins in my chart and Yet Wah has 9. The best I can do is look at which factors each business is winning at to try to identify a pattern of what Google is weighting most, both organically and locally. With both restaurants being so basic in their marketing, and with neither one absolutely running away with the game, what we have here is a close race. While I'd love to be able to declare a totally obvious winner, the best I could do as a consultant, in this case, would be to draw up a plan of defense or offense.

If my client were Ping's:

Ping's needs to defend its #1 local ranking if it doesn't want to lose it. Its greatest weaknesses which must be resolved are:

  • The absence of on-page SEO
  • Thin content
  • Robots.txt issues

To remain strong, Ping's should also work on:

  • Improving citation health
  • Directing the non-www version of their site to the www one
  • A professional site redesign could possibly improve conversions

Ping's should accomplish these things to defend its current local rank and to try to move up organically.

If my client were Yet Wah:

Yet Wah needs to try to achieve victory over Ping's in the local packs, as it has done in the organic results. To do that, Yet Wah should:

  • Earn links to the GMB landing page URL and the domain
  • Create strong text content on its high-level pages, including putting a complete dining menu in real text on the website
  • Deal with the second website featuring duplicate NAP

Yet Wah should also:

  • Complete work on its citation health
  • Work hard to get some new 5-star reviews by delighting customers with something special
  • Consider adding the word "Restaurant" to their signage, so that they can't be reported for spamming the GMB name field.
  • Consider a professional redesign of the website to improve conversions

Yet Wah should accomplish these things in an effort to surpass Ping's.

And, with either client being mine, I'd then be taking a second pass to further investigate anything problematic that came up in the initial audit, so that I could make further technical or creative suggestions.

Big geo-industry picture analysis

Given that no competitor for this particular search term has been able to beat out Ping's or Yet Wah in the local pack, and given the minimal efforts these two brands have thus far made, there's a tremendous chance for any Chinese restaurant in San Rafael to become the dominant player. Any competitor that dedicates itself to running on all cylinders (professional, optimized website with great content, a healthy link profile, a competitive number of high-star reviews, healthy citations, etc.) could definitely surpass all other contestants. This is not a tough market and there are no players who can't be bested.

My sample case has been, as I've said, a close race. You may be facing an audit where there are deeply entrenched dominant players whose statistics far surpass those of a business you're hoping to assist. But the basic process is the same:

  1. Look at the top-ranking business.
  2. Fill out the chart (adding any other fields you feel are important).
  3. Then discover the strengths of the dominant company, as well as its potential weaknesses.
  4. Contrast these findings with those you've charted for the company you're helping and you'll be able to form a plan for improvement.

And don't forget the user proximity factor. Any company's most adjacent customers will see pack results that vary either slightly or significantly from what a user sees from 20, 50, or 1,000 miles away. In my specific study, it happened to be the third result in the pack that went haywire once a user got 50 miles away, while the top two remained dominant and statically ranked for searchers as far away as the East Coast.

Because of this phenomenon of distance, it's vital for business owners to be educated about the fact that they are serving two user groups: one that is located in the neighborhood or city of the business, and another that could be anywhere in the country or the world. This doesn't just matter for destinations like hotels or public amusements. In California (a big state), Internet users on a road trip from Palm Springs may be looking to end their 500-mile drive at a Chinese restaurant in San Rafael, so you can't just think hyper-locally; you've got to see the bigger local picture. And you've got to do the analysis to find ways of winning as often as you can with both consumer groups.

You take it from here, auditor!

My local competitive audit chart is a basic one, looking at 30+ factors. What would you add? How would you improve it? Did I miss a GMB duplicate listing, or review spam? What's working best for your agency in doing local audits these days? Do you use a chart, or just provide a high-level text summary of your internal findings? And, if you have any further theories as to how Ping's is winning the local pack, I'd love for you to share them in the comments.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

from Moz Blog https://moz.com/blog/basic-local-competitive-audit
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/how-to-perform-basic-local-business.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/22/how-to-perform-a-basic-local-business-competitive-audit/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/22/how-to-perform-a-basic-local-business-competitive-audit/
via IFTTT




from WordPress https://mrliberta.wordpress.com/2017/08/22/how-to-perform-a-basic-local-business-competitive-audit/
via IFTTT

Monday, August 21, 2017

La nueva Search Console – Un vistazo sobre dos nuevas prestaciones experimentales

Search Console se lanzó de forma oficial ahora hace más de 10 años. Hoy incluye más de 25 herramientas e informes cubriendo AMP, datos estructurados y herramientas de pruebas en tiempo real, todo ello diseñado para ayudar a mejorar el rendimiento de tu sitio.


Ahora hemos decidido embarcarnos en una revisión de considerable envergadura para mejorar Search Console. Esto es lo que esperamos obtener con estos cambios:


  • Información más accionable – Vamos a agrupar los errores que identifiquemos en base a lo que pensemos que es su causa común, y así ayudarte a identificar las soluciones que debes implementar. Organizaremos estos errores en "tareas" que tienen un estado para ayudarte a saber si el problema está todavía presente o si Google ha detectado la solución que hayas implementado. También podrás seguir el progreso de las páginas afectadas.


  • Mejor soporte para tu organización – Después de hablar con numerosas organizaciones, hemos aprendido que normalmente hay múltiples personas involucradas en implementar, diagnosticar y arreglar los problemas de los sitios web. Por ésta razón vamos a introducir una funcionalidad para compartir que te permite escoger una tarea y compartirla con el resto del grupo.


  • Comunicación más rápida entre tú y Google – Hemos creado un mecanismo que te permite iterar de forma rápida sobre los cambios que implementes, de forma que no tengas que esperar a que Google vuelva a rastrear tu sitio para que después te diga que el problema no está arreglado. Vamos a proporcionar una funcionalidad de "prueba en el momento" que provocará un rastreo automático una vez que veamos que todo funciona bien. Del mismo modo, la herramienta de pruebas incluirá fragmentos de código y una vista previa – para que puedas ver de forma rápida dónde está el problema, confirmar que está arreglado y comprobar cómo se verán las páginas en la búsqueda.


Durante las semanas siguientes, vamos a lanzar does funcionalidades BETA de la nueva Search Console para un reducido grupo de usuarios: el "Index Coverage Report" y el "AMP fixing flow".




1. "Inex Coverage Report"
Este informe muestra el número de páginas indexadas en tu sitio, información sobre porqué algunas de ellas no se pudieron indexar, así como ejemplos de páginas y consejos sobre cómo solucionar problemas de indexación. También incorpora la opción de subir un sitemap y la posibilidad de filtrar los datos de cobertura de índice usando sitemaps que hayas subido.
Aquí tienes una vista previa del "Index Coverage Report":



2. El nuevo "AMP fixing flow"
La nueva experiencia para arreglar problemas con AMP comienza con el informe de AMP. Este informe muestra las incidencias que están afectando tu sitio, agrupadas por el error que las causa. De forma que puedes investigar con más profundidad para obtener más detalles sobre el error en cuestión, incluyendo ejemplos de páginas afectadas. Una vez arreglado el error, haz click en un botón para verificar si ya está solucionado y mandar a Google rastrear de nuevo las páginas afectadas por la incidencia. Google te notificará del progreso del rastreo, y actualizará el informe a medida que tus cambios sean validados.



A medida que empecemos a experimentar con estas nuevas funcionalidades, algunos usuarios verán este nuevo diseño a lo largo de las próxima semanas.

Escrito por John Mueller y el equipo de Search Console. Publicado por Joan Ortiz, equipo de calidad de búsqueda.

from El Blog para Webmasters http://webmaster-es.googleblog.com/2017/08/search-console-nuevas-prestaciones.html
via IFTTT

from Blogger http://imlocalseo.blogspot.com/2017/08/la-nueva-search-console-un-vistazo.html
via IFTTT

from IM Local SEO https://imlocalseo.wordpress.com/2017/08/21/la-nueva-search-console-un-vistazo-sobre-dos-nuevas-prestaciones-experimentales/
via IFTTT

from Gana Dinero Colaborando | Wecon Project https://weconprojectspain.wordpress.com/2017/08/21/la-nueva-search-console-un-vistazo-sobre-dos-nuevas-prestaciones-experimentales/
via IFTTT




from WordPress https://mrliberta.wordpress.com/2017/08/21/la-nueva-search-console-un-vistazo-sobre-dos-nuevas-prestaciones-experimentales/
via IFTTT